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Religious Hospitallers of the Tubercular Saints

Welcome!

***A Proposed Charism that will emerge as Congregational Recluses in the CAMM/CCMM Medical Division.***

These religious are dedicated to the saints who died of tuberculosis.

The Hospitallers' tasks will include:
 
1.  Conducting tuberculosis sanataria
2.  Visiting tuberculosis patients in hospitals and in their
     homes
3.  Infection control/prevention
4.  Researching a cure
 
The United States leads the world in the number of TB cases, with Mexico coming in second.  In the U.S., AIDS patients and Hispanics have the highest number of TB cases.
 
Sanataria such as Waverly Hills in Louisville, Kentucky, existed until those wonderful pills known as antibiotics were introduced.  Unfortunately, due to over- and misuse, the antibiotics are losing their potency against the bacterium which causes TB.
 
The Hospitallers' habit will consist of a black tunic with rust scapular and cowl for the men; capelet and veil for the women.   White habits will be worn when in clinical situations.

The nursing habit will look like. . .
NashvilleDominicanNovices.jpg
these Nashville Dominican novices'.

Due to the highly contagious nature of TB, those who feel called to work at the sanataria will commit themselves to those sites. 

The Religious Hospitallers of the Tubercular Saints will be Ecclesia Dei Traditionalists.  They will be bi-ritual, but prefer to worship with the Traditional Latin Mass of the 1962 Missal; pray the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Latin; pray in common the Rosary in Latin; and have the Latin Salve Procession after Compline (Night Prayer).

The Religious Hospitallers of the Tubercular Saints is a project of the Cloister Outreach Affiliate New Foundations (CONF).

Please click here to visit the CONF website.

Questions or comments? Get in touch with Gemma, CONF Admissions Secretary & Affiliate Founder, at:

conewfoundations@lycos.com